Atlanta Psychologist Dr. Betsy Gard - psychotherapy for children, adolescents, families, couples. Dr Gard is a licensed psychologist providing couples therapy, marriage counseling, clinical psychologist, family therapy and is a national speaker. Serving Dunwoody, Sandy Springs, Roswell, Norcross, Marietta, Smyrna, Vinings, Doraville, Decatur and Johns Creek areas of Atlanta Atlanta Psychologist Dr. Betsy Gard: couples therapy, marriage counseling, clinical psychologist, family therapy. Located at 7000 Peachtree Dunwoody Road, Sandy Springs GA 30328. Convenient to Dunwoody, Sandy Springs, Roswell, Norcross, Marietta, Smyrna, Vinings, Doraville, Decatur and Johns Creek areas of Atlanta

Atlanta Psychologist Dr. Betsy Gard - psychotherapy for children, adolescents, families, couples. Dr Gard is a licensed psychologist providing couples therapy, marriage counseling, clinical psychologist, family therapy and is a national speaker. Serving Dunwoody, Sandy Springs, Roswell, Norcross, Marietta, Smyrna, Vinings, Doraville, Decatur and Johns Creek areas of Atlanta

Atlanta Psychologist Dr. Betsy Gard - psychotherapy for children, adolescents, families, couples. Dr Gard is a licensed psychologist providing couples therapy, marriage counseling, clinical psychologist, family therapy and is a national speaker. Serving Dunwoody, Sandy Springs, Roswell, Norcross, Marietta, Smyrna, Vinings, Doraville, Decatur and Johns Creek areas of Atlanta
Atlanta Psychologist Dr. Betsy Gard - psychotherapy for children, adolescents, families, couples. Dr Gard is a licensed psychologist providing couples therapy, marriage counseling, clinical psychologist, family therapy and is a national speaker. Serving Dunwoody, Sandy Springs, Roswell, Norcross, Marietta, Smyrna, Vinings, Doraville, Decatur and Johns Creek areas of Atlanta

 


Atlanta Psychologist Dr. Betsy Gard's Articles and Abstracts

Marriage and Couple Counseling
by Dr. Betsy Gard, Ph.D.

  Marriage and couple counseling can make the difference between a family torn apart by divorce and a family that survives and thrives. Marriage therapy can help a couple that is struggling with day-to-day issues and also the couple that is coping with life altering events like the death of a family member, the loss of a job, the stress of move, an affair, or problems managing the children.
  When a couple comes for marriage therapy, they come not only to work on specific issues but also to work on their communication styles. In therapy, the couple will come to understand how to better problem solve, how to communicate more effectively, and how they’re shared interactions can be weaved together to create a better understanding to forge a happier future.
  Many couples are coping with complicated relationships as they are blending stepchildren, ex-spouses, and ex-in-laws. They may also have aging parents they are responsible for and other relatives who make demands on them. Marital and family therapy can help couples sort their priorities and reduce conflict so that the bond between the couple remains strong.
  Some couples come for counseling before the marriage to help address issues before they become ingrained. This helps launch a new marriage in the best way possible.
   Some couples who have decided they can no longer remain married may chose to come in for counseling to help them work together in the best manner to reduce the trauma of divorce on the children. Couples who work together in therapy often have more cooperative parenting relationships and less conflict in their post-divorce relationships. 
  Marriage and couple counseling is an investment in the relationship and the family that pays off with dividends that last long beyond the initial time spent in the office.


Working Through Trauma
by Dr. Betsy Gard, Ph.D.

  At some time in life, approximately 8% of us will experience a significant life event that will leave us traumatized. It will have shaken us and made us have symptoms of anxiety, made us remember the event repeatedly, and made us try to push the painful memory out of our minds. For some of us, this very painful memory will also be associated with grief and loss. No matter how strong we think we are, this kind of experience can shake us up and we all need help and support when we go through a traumatic experience like this. Professional help can help us resolve this trauma, whether the event was quite recent or if it was a long time ago. Post trauma reactions can be sneaky and come back even years later. If someone you know or if you yourself have had a traumatic experience, it is best to not just push it away. Some people may need to get professional intervention.
  There are highly effective treatments that can rapidly treat posttraumatic stress disorder. There has been very good research on these treatments and they are readily available. It is good to know that those who have experienced these very painful and very difficult events can get this kind of help.


Community Mental Health Response to Crisis
Betsy A Gard and Josef I. Ruzek
Journal of Clinical Psychology in Session
Vol. 62(8). 1029-1041 (2006)

Abstract:
Mental health is seen as an important aspect in the immunity response to crisis and disaster. Research offers limited guidance to what interventions are likely to be effective in preventing post disaster mental health problems. This articles reviews recommended elements of mental health responses to community disasters. Using 9/11 and Hurricane Katrina illustrate different factors influencing response as examples. Clinical suggestions for community planning and actions of individual psychologists conclude the article.


Hypnotic age regression and cognitive perceptual tasks
B. Gard, R.M. Kurtz
Am J Clin Hypn.
1979 Apr;21(4):270-7..PMID: 382825
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Related citations:
An empirical study to examine whether hypnotized subjects with age regression would be able to respond to cognitive tasks congruent with their regressed age. Results were reviewed with regards to the implications of age regression and the hypnotic state.


Changes in Psychiatric Admission MMPI Profiles over a Period of 15-20 years
C.S. Newmark, J. Konanc, C. Aponte, B. Gard
Journal of Clinical Psychology
1977 Jul: 33(3):741-3.

Abstract:
An attempt was made to compare admission MMPI profiles of a matched sample of psychiatric inpatients over a 15-20 year period. For both makes and females, significant decreases in MMPI indices of psychopathology occurred. Possible reasons for this decrease are presented.


ACTIVE PARENTING PUBLISHERS
(28 YEARS OF HELPING FAMILIES FIND THEIR WAY)

http://www.activeparenting.com/
by Michael H. Popkin, Ph.D., Betsy Gard, Ph.D., and Marilyn Montgomery, Ph.D.

This is a multicultural, video-based discussion program for parents of children ages 1 to 4. It addresses basic parenting skills, the stages of development, and more. This program is perfect for the new parent, teen parents and caregivers. SeeProgram Description for more information about program content, including sample video. Available in English or Spanish.
Standard Program Kit includes:
• 1 DVD (26 min.)
• 1 Leader's Guide
• 1 Parent's Workbook & Tips Booklet
• 1 Parent Completion Certificate
• 2 Course Announcement Posters
• 1 Reproducible Promotional Flyer (downloadable)



Doing Good - The Pro Bono Network - Georgia Psychologist, Summer, 2011 by Dr. Betsy Gard, Ph.D.

Gard, Betsy A., “The Role of Interpreters During Disasters”, American Translators Association Chronicle, Vol. VIII, #7; July, 2009, pp. 19-23.

Gard, Betsy A. & Ruzek, Josef I., “Community Mental Health Response to Crisis,” Journal of Clinical Psychology: In Session, Vol. 62 (8), pp. 1029-1041, 2006.

Compton, Michael, Cibulas, B.K., Gard, B., Kaslow, N.I., Kotwicki, R.J., Reissman, D.B., Schor, L. & Wetterhall, S., “Incorporating Community Mental Health into Local Bioterrorism Response Planning: Experiences from the Dekalb County Board of Health.” Community Mental Health Journal, Vol. 41, No. 6, December 2005, pp. 647-663.

Popkin, Michael H., B, Gard & M. Montgomery, 1,2,3,4 Parents, Active Parenting Publishers, 1996. Program to train parents of young children includes workbook, teacher’s guide, video and overhead transparencies.

Gard, Betsy A., “Diagnosing and Treating Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in Children & Adolescents,” Insight, Vol. 16, No. 2, Fall 1995, pp. 20-23.

Gard, Betsy A., “Disaster Response Team; the Summer of Our Deluge,” Georgia Psychologist, Vol. 48, No. 2, Fall 1994, pp. 20-21.

Dorr, Darwin, W. Barley, B. Gard, B.C. Welch, “Understanding and Treating Borderline Personality Organization,” Psychotherapy Theory, Research & Practice, Fall 1984.

Gard, B. & R. Kurtz, “Hypnotic Age Regression and Cognitive Perceptual Tasks,” American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis, Vol. 21, No. 4, April 1979, pp. 270-277.

An Investigation of Different Treatment Components and Different Treatment Lengths in the Modification of Nonassertion, Dissertation Thesis, Washington University, 1978.

Meisbove, G. & B. Gard, “The Development of a Training Program to teach behavior principles to Development Day Care Center Staffs,” North Carolina Journal of Mental Health, Vol. VIII, No. 9, Winter, 1978, pp. 51-53.

Newmark, C., C. Aponte, B. Gard, J. Konanc, “Changes in psychiatric admission MMPI profiles over a period of 15 to 20 years,” Journal of Clinical Psychology, July 1977, Vol. 33, No. 3, pp. 741-743.


PLACES TO GO TO OBTAIN MORE RESOURCES;
www.apa.org
www.psychsource.org
www.gapsychology.org
www.nctsn.org
www.cabf.org

 

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